25 Principles of Adult Behavior

John Perry Barlow was an American poet, essayist, political activist and cattle rancher. He was also a lyricist for the Grateful Dead.

On 7 February 2018, Barlow passed away. As the tributes an obituaries poured in, Barlow’s 25 Principles of Adult Behavior was frequently referenced. I hadn’t looked at them in a long while but as I reread them, I was reminded of the power in these simple, fundamental principles.

I was also struck by how many of these principles could be—and should be—applied by public speakers.Rest in peace, John.

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About John Zimmer

International speaker, presentation skills expert, lawyer, improv performer
This entry was posted in Leadership, Motivation and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to 25 Principles of Adult Behavior

  1. Philip Selby says:

    John,

    With regard to happiness, Barlow seems to contradict the American Declaration of Independence : “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal , that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness .”

    He is not alone. In his book: “Sapiens, A brief history of mankind”, Harari considers the pursuit of pleasure, rather than happiness, to be an innate human attribute.

    Best wishes, Philip

    Liked by 1 person

    • John Zimmer says:

      Hi Philip. Thanks for the comment.

      I’m not sure that Barlow’s philosophy is an outright contradiction of the Declaration of Independence. I don’t think we can pursue happiness directly; rather, we have to pursue something that has meaning for us and such pursuit / achievement will lead to happiness. In other words, happiness is a by-product of something else.

      “Sapiens” is a great book. I am looking forward to Harari’s follow-up, “Homo Deus”.

      Like

  2. Great, thanks for sharing John

    Liked by 1 person

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