Tag Archives: rhetoric

Quotes for Public Speakers (No. 321) – Plato

“Rhetoric is the art of ruling the minds of men.” —  Plato Photo courtesy of Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons

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In the footsteps of Aristotle

In May 2018, I visited Athen, Greece to speak at a conference. While there, I had the opportunity to visit the Acropolis and see the Parthenon. With the Parthenon as an amazing backdrop, I made a short video on Aristotle’s … Continue reading

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Rhetorical Devices: Symploce

This post is part of a series on rhetoric and rhetorical devices. For other posts in the series, please click this link. Device: Symploce (pronounced sim-plo-see or sim-plo-kee) Origin: From the Greek συμπλοκήν (simplokeen), meaning “interweaving”. In plain English: Repetition of … Continue reading

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A lesson from the Parthenon

I was recently in Athens, Greece to speak at a conference. While there, I had one free day and, as it was my first time in Greece, there was one place I had to see: the Parthenon that sits atop … Continue reading

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Quotes for Public Speakers (No. 245) – Aristotle

“An emotional speaker always makes his audience feel with him, even when there is nothing in his arguments; which is why many speakers try to overwhelm their audience by mere noise.” — Aristotle

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Rhetoric for Persuasive Speaking

Dukascopy Bank is a Swiss online bank that provides trading services, particularly in the foreign exchange marketplace. One of its subsidiaries, Dukascopy TV, broadcasts shows about business matters on the Internet. I have been interviewed there a few times, for example … Continue reading

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Rhetorical Devices: Anastrophe

This post is part of a series on rhetoric and rhetorical devices. For other posts in the series, please click this link. Device: Anastrophe Origin: From the Greek ἀναστροφή (anastrophē), meaning “a turning back or about”. In plain English: Changing the … Continue reading

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Rhetorical Devices: Syllepsis

This post is part of a series on rhetoric and rhetorical devices. For other posts in the series, please click this link. Device: Syllepsis Origin: From the Greek σύλληψις (sillipsis) meaning to take together. In plain English: When one word–often a verb–is used … Continue reading

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Aristotle’s Three Pillars of Rhetoric

On 1 June 2016, I announced the launch of a new digital magazine for public speaking professionals: Presentation Guru. I am proud to be one of the co-founders of the site. This post is part of a series designed to share the great content on Presentation … Continue reading

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The Rhetorical Genius of Muhammad Ali

The world has lost a legend. A boxing legend, a sporting legend, a human legend. Muhammad Ali has passed away at the age of 74. Born Cassius Marcellus Clay in Louisville, Kentucky. Ali gained worldwide attention in 1960 when, at the age … Continue reading

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Rhetorical Devices: Antithesis

This post is part of a series on rhetoric and rhetorical devices. For other posts in the series, please click this link. Device: Antithesis Origin: From the Greek ἀντί (anti) meaning “against” and θέσις (thesis) meaning “position”. In plain English: Contrasting two different … Continue reading

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Rhetorical Devices: Tricolon

This post is part of a series on rhetoric and rhetorical devices. For other posts in the series, please click this link. Device: Tricolon Origin: From the Greek τρία (tria), meaning “three” and κῶλον (kôlon), meaning “member” or “clause”. In plain English: A … Continue reading

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